Coronavirus Treatment (Covid-19): Where Are We?


COVID-19 symptoms

People infected with COVID-19 may have few or no symptoms. You may not know that you have symptoms of COVID-19 as they may be similar to those of a cold or flu.
Symptoms include:
  • cough
  • fever
  • breathing difficulties
  • pneumonia in both lungs
In severe cases, the infection can lead to death.
Symptoms can take up to 14 days to appear after exposure to COVID-19. It is the longest known incubation period for this disease.
Recent studies show that the virus can be spread to other people by an infected person who does not have symptoms? This includes people who:
  • have no symptoms (presymptomatic) yet
  • never show symptoms (asymptomatic)
Experts know that this type of transmission occurs when people have close contact with each other or are in a close physical environment, but they do not know what extent. This means that it is extremely important to follow the proven prevention measures.

If You Or Your Child Becomes ILL

If you have symptoms of COVID-19:
  • stay at home for 14 days to avoid infecting others.
  • if you do not live alone, isolated yourself in a room or maintain a distance of 2 meters with other people
  • visit a health professional or your local public health authority.
  • call ahead to let the person you talk to know about your symptoms, then follow their instructions
Children with mild symptoms of COVID-19 can stay at home with a caregiver for the duration of their recovery without needing to be hospitalized. If you are caring for a child in whom COVID-19 is suspected or probable, it is important to follow the advice of caregivers. These tips will help you protect yourself and others who live in the house, as well as people in your community.
If you feel sick while traveling to Canada or arriving:
  • notify the flight attendant or a Canadian border services officer
  • please report to a Canada Border Services Officer when you arrive in Canada if you think you have been exposed to a source of COVID-19, even if you have no symptoms
  • the Quarantine Act requires it
  • Canada Border Services Officer will give your instructions to follow

Check if you have been exposed

Have you took a flight, cruise, train recently, or participated in a public gathering? Check exhibition venues listed to see if you have been exposed to Covid-19.

Take care of your mental health

The COVID-19 pandemic is new and unexpected. This can be destabilizing and cause a feeling of loss of control. It is normal for individuals and communities to experience sadness, stress, confusion, fear, and worry during a crisis. Make sure you take care of your mental and physical well-being and seek help if you feel overwhelmed.

Coronavirus Diagnosis

Coronavirus infections are diagnosed by health care providers based on the symptoms presented and are confirmed by laboratory tests.

Coronavirus Treatment

The majority of people with mild symptoms will recover on their own.
If you are concerned about your symptoms, you will need to practice self-monitoring and contact your health care provider. He can recommend measures to relieve symptoms.

Vaccine

If you received a flu shot, it  does  protect you not against coronaviruses.
There is no vaccine or treatment yet to cure or prevent it. However, the COVID-19 pandemic has prompted a global review of therapies that could be used to treat or prevent the disease.
Health Canada is accelerating the import and sale of medical devices to diagnose, treat, or prevent COVID-19.

About Coronaviruses

The Coronaviruses are a large family of viruses. Some cause disease in humans and others in animals. Human coronaviruses are common and usually result in mild discomfort, similar to that of the common cold.
COVID-19 is a new disease that has not yet been identified in humans. In rare cases, coronaviruses that infect animals can infect people; even more rarely, they can be transmitted through close person-to-person contact.
There have been 2 other coronaviruses that have spread from animals to humans, and have caused serious illness in humans: